help us make oregon a conflict-free mineral state!

Did you know your cell phone, computer, camera and so many other things you use everyday might contain what is know as "conflict minerals"? The mining of conflict minerals (tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold - also known as 3TG) has been fueling armed militias in the Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo) for far too long. By demanding that companies source minerals through a transparent supply chain, we can all help bring peace to the Congo.

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There are already federal regulations in place and international guidelines but the federal regulations are being threatened by the current US Administration. Change doesn’t happen overnight but it is clear that the creation of transparent supply chains has made a remarkable difference in peace and stability in Congo's mines.

Oregon has the chance to implement its own policy. By passing a state conflict-free minerals procurement bill, Oregon would become the fourth state in the country to enact legislation that places a preference on companies that are working to source conflict-free minerals for their products.

JOIN US! We're joining forces with local and national organizations to help make the happen. Email us at neveragaincoalition@gmail.com and join the campaign!

Read our statement: A Conflict-Free Minerals Policy for the State of Oregon. 

If you want to find out more about how major companies rank in their efforts to responsibly source 3TG minerals, check out the Enough Project's report - Conflict Mineral Companies Ranking.

UPDATE: On August 22nd, Portland City Council voted to approve a more comprehensive Sustainable Procurement Policy for the city. This new policy will give preference to companies that are working to source conflict-free minerals (3TG - tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold) for their products. Transparency in the supply chain has greatly improved the conditions in mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We are very thankful to Portland City Commissioners and Mayor Ted Wheeler for voting for this expanded policy.