Noon Time Talk: Life in the World's Largest Refugee Camp
May
29
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Time Talk: Life in the World's Largest Refugee Camp

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dr. Jim Peck, PSU graduate student Anis Zaman, and photographer David Ewald have all spent time in Kutupalong mega-camp where over a million Rohingya refugees are currently living after fleeing genocide in their home country of Burma/Myanmar. Join them for a conversation on what their experiences were in providing aid and medical care to Rohingya refugees and David's project to put cameras into the hands of Rohingya refugee youth.  Free and open to the public.

This program is presented in collaboration with the photography exhibit Exiled to Nowhere by documentary photographer Greg Constantine, on view at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education until June 11. This exhibit documents not only the plight of the Rohingya and how the tactics taken over time have led to the near destruction of this community, but also shows how, in spite of all that has been done to destroy them, the Rohingya continue to find a way to survive and persevere regardless of the ground beneath their feet.

Jim Peck, M.D. is Adjunct Professor of Surgery at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) for the Divisions of Vascular Surgery. He was a private practitioner in Portland since 1981. He has been on 17 humanitarian missions. He has worked for Doctors without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) in Liberia, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and South Sudan. In the January & February of 2017 and May & June 2018 Jim was at Mother of Mercy Hospital in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan. He will return to Sudan in October 2019 until December. He was in Bangladesh for the Rohingya refugee in January and February of 2018 and 2019 with Medical Teams International.

Anis Zaman was born and raised in Bangladesh. He has worked with the United Nations in Liberia as a peacekeeper and observer. He has also worked as a peacekeeping trainer in Indonesia. Anis is currently working on his masters in Conflict Resolution at PSU. As part of his masters, his thesis is on ‘The Rise of Religious Nationalism in Myanmar’. Anis is the co-founder of the Bangladesh Student Association (BSA) in PSU and is involved with volunteer and leadership programs in Portland.

David Ewald was a founding partner of the product design studio, Uncorked. David helped the formation of Safecast, a non-profit focused on radiation & air-quality monitoring started after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake. He teaches, both as an adjunct professor at the University of Oregon, and as a lecturer for other institutions such as ArtCenter, Portland State University, Oregon State University, and Pacific Northwest College of Art. David is an accomplished photographer who blends his love of storytelling and social impact, most recently in shaping a photography storytelling project alongside the Rohingya community.

Sponsored by: Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Never Again Coalition, PSU’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Medical Teams International

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The More Who Die the Less We Care: Confronting Genocide and the Deadly Arithmetic of Compassion
May
9
6:00 PM18:00

The More Who Die the Less We Care: Confronting Genocide and the Deadly Arithmetic of Compassion

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Why have good people and their governments repeatedly ignored mass murder and genocide? Most people will make an effort to help individuals in need but often become numbly indifferent when the victims are part of a large group seeking help. Why does this occur? How can insights from psychological research provide useful guidance to address this problem? Professor Paul Slovic examines these important questions in this talk.

This event is free and open to the public. Register HERE.

Paul Slovic is a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon and a founder and President of Decision Research. He holds a B.A. from Stanford University (1959) and an M.A (1962) and Ph.D. (1964) from the University of Michigan. He studies human judgment, decision making, and the psychology of risk. With colleagues worldwide, he has developed methods to describe risk perceptions and measure their impacts on individuals and society. His most recent work examines "psychic numbing" and the failure to respond to mass human tragedies.

He is a past President of the Society for Risk Analysis and in 1991 received its Distinguished Contribution Award. In 1993 he received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association. In 1995 he received the Outstanding Contribution to Science Award from the Oregon Academy of Science. He has received honorary doctorates from the Stockholm School of Economics (1996) and the University of East Anglia (2005). He was elected to The American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2015 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016.

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Film Screening: Rohingya Short Documentaries
Apr
27
2:00 PM14:00

Film Screening: Rohingya Short Documentaries

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for two short documentaries about Rohingya women and children from Burma followed by a conversation with the filmmakers from both films.  

Mother, Daughter, Sister is a half-hour documentary about ethnic minority women affected by rape as a weapon of war in Myanmar. Told through the eyes of four Rohingya and Kachin survivors, the film shows the brutality of the Myanmar military, the resiliency of survivors and their quest for justice and accountability. 

We Are Blood is a ten minute film that follows a kindergarten teacher as she finds grace in the smiles and play of Rohingya children and dignity in the eyes of their mothers inside Bangladesh's refugee camps where a culture faces the possibility of extinction.



Both filmmakers will be present for a post screening conversation.

The event is being held in conjunction with photographer Greg Constantine’s exhibit Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya, on display at OJMCHE April 16 to May 26.

This event is co-sponsored by PSU's Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education and the Never Again Coalition.

Free with museum admission. For more information visit OJMCHE’s event page or email us at neveragaincoalition@gmail.com





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Sexual and Gender Based Violence: The Case of Rohingya Women and Girls
Apr
7
2:00 PM14:00

Sexual and Gender Based Violence: The Case of Rohingya Women and Girls

  • Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 333 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dr. Gwen Mitchell and Aerlyn Pfeil discuss their experiences working with Rohingya women and the impact of sexual violence in conflict environments. The conversation will examine obstacles Rohingya women and girls face in seeking justice, accountability, and protection given their current status as stateless people. They will also go into the impacts that these experiences will have for generations to come and the positive role Rohingya women have as providers of support, hope, healing and resilience within their communities. 

Aerlyn Pfeil is a certified professional midwife and sexual violence program consultant from Portland, Oregon. She has been practicing midwifery since 1999 and joined MSF in 2011. She has worked in maternal health programs in South Sudan, Haiti, Senegal, the Somali region of Ethiopia, and Papua New Guinea. Aerlyn has been an active association member since joining MSF and was recently elected to the board. She holds a BA in sociology from Whitman College and a BS in midwifery and a degree in global health from the University of Manchester.

Dr. Gwen Vogel Mitchell is an Assistant Professor and Field Placement Director for the International Disaster Psychology M.A. program at the University of Denver. She is a licensed clinical psychologist in the State of Colorado where she also maintains a private practice. Dr. Mitchell has worked for many years as a trainer, consultant, and program developer for humanitarian organizations including Medecins Sans Frontiers, the Center for Victims of Torture and the Open Society Foundation in various locations including Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Jordan, Myanmar, Thailand and Bosnia. She also provided support for a global evaluation of UNHCR's mental health and psychosocial support for humanitarian staff and was a member of a UNICEF technical work group focused on child protection inside Myanmar. She played a part in the development of a mental health policy for the country of Liberia and has developed programming for marginalized groups including People Living with HIV/AIDS, LGBTQ communities, former political prisoners and torture survivors. 

Sponsors include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, Medecins Sans Frontiere, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support form Eric and Alia Breon.

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A Path to Justice: Examining the Legal Challenges of the Rohingya Crisis
Apr
6
4:00 PM16:00

A Path to Justice: Examining the Legal Challenges of the Rohingya Crisis

The Rohingya face unique challenges in seeking justice and accountability for the crimes committed against them. This panel includes investigators of two, separate fact-finding missions to investigate atrocities against the Rohingya in Myanmar. Kyle Wood was part of a human rights law group contracted with the U.S. State Department (which created this report) and Al Borrelli was part of the UN fact-finding mission on Myanmar. This program is presented as part of Exiled to Nowhere: A Symposium on the Rohingya Crisis.

Kyle Wood is an Assistant Attorney General in the Criminal Justice Division of the Washington State Attorney General's Office. His practice focuses on initiating and supporting efforts to end human trafficking in Washington. Mr. Wood is also an international lawyer with deep experience investigating and prosecuting mass atrocities. In April 2018, Mr. Wood interviewed dozens of ethnic Rohingya men and women living in refugee camps in Bangladesh, as part of a U.S. State Department investigation into allegations of mass atrocities committed against the Rohingya in Rakhine State. The results of that investigation, compiled by the Public International Law & Policy Group, a global pro bono law firm, can be found at https://www.publicinternationallawandpolicygroup.org/rohingya-report. From 2005 until 2015, Mr. Wood worked as a trial and appellate lawyer in the Office of the Prosecutor at the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), based in The Hague, Netherlands. Mr. Wood litigated more than a dozen trials and appeals in cases involving charges of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, or grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949.

Allen Borrelli is a former U.S. Army military intelligence analyst who then spent 15 years working at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia for the prosecution as a military intelligence analyst before moving to Mexico in order to consult internationally on issues of atrocity crimes. He most recently worked for the UN as a military expert/advisor on the fact-finding mission established by a Security Council Resolution to investigate the ongoing events and allegations stemming from the situation in Myanmar. He specializes in investigation, analysis, and consulting on issues of command and control, command responsibility, and the de jure and de facto structures of military, civilian and political institutions alleged to have been involved in violations of international or local laws. He has lectured and trained individuals and government institutions around the world on investigating leadership-level cases; evidence collection and assessment; command and control in a war crimes context, and intelligence analysis. Additionally, he has been accepted as an expert military analyst in both U.S. and international courts. As a part of his work, he has been directly involved in the investigating and/or prosecuting of seven different heads of states, from five countries, on four continents.

Sponsors for the event include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support form Eric and Alia Breon.

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In-depth Discussion about the Rohingya Crisis
Apr
6
2:00 PM14:00

In-depth Discussion about the Rohingya Crisis

The Rohingya crisis is ongoing, but few are aware of it beyond brief and disconnected news headlines. To give background and context to this crisis, panelists, including former Burma MP Shwe Maung, Yusuf Iqbal of Americans for Rohingya, Reza Uddin of Friends of Rohingya USA, and photographer Greg Constantine, discuss Burma’s carefully planned genocide of the Rohingya as well as the current situation for Rohingya living within and outside Burma. This program is presented as part of Exiled to Nowhere: A Symposium on the Rohingya Crisis.

Yusuf Iqbal was born in Loilem Shan State, Burma, in 1974. He attended IIUM Malaysia and graduated with a Bachelor of Management Information Systems. During his time at IIUM, he participated in various student activities and gained awareness in Malaysia about the Rohingya persecution in Burma. After graduation, Yusuf founded a successful tour business. In 2005, Yusuf came to the United States and settled in Portland. In 2010, he founded America West Trading LLC. Today, America West Trading LLC is successful with two grocery markets, Mingala International Market, and a restaurant, Mandhi House. Yusuf is not only a businessman but also an active community organizer and activist for human rights in Burma, focusing on Muslim and Rohingya issues. He is also a founder and a principal of an Islamic weekend school where more than 70 students have been learning about Islam and Quran for 7 years. Yusuf is the founder of the nonprofit America for Rohingya.

Documentary photographer Greg Constantine has spent 13 years documenting the ongoing abuses against the Rohingya. His work and the exhibition, Exiled To Nowhere: Burma's Rohingya have been shown in over 25 cities around the world. The exhibition documents not only the plight of the Rohingya, and how the tactics taken over time have led to the near destruction of this community, but also how, in spite of all that has been done to destroy them, the Rohingya continue to find a way to survive and persevere regardless of the ground beneath their feet.

Shwe Maung was born in 1965 in Burma. He's a former Member of Parliament in Myanmar (Burma), founder and president of AiPAD (Arakan Institute for Peace and Development) and RNDC (Rohingya National Development Council), as well as a board member of APHR (ASEAN Parliamentarians for Human Rights) (www.aseanmp.org) and founding member of IPPFoRB (International Panel of Parliamentarians for Freedom of Religion or Belief (www.ippforb.com). He has engaged with members of U.S. Congress, former U.S. presidents, and U.N. officials on a variety of issues related to the discrimination and persecution of the Rohingya by the Myanmar (Burma) government. He currently resides in Texas.

Reza Uddin is a Rohingya Muslim born and raised in Maungdaw, Rakhine State, Burma. His immediate family still lives in Maungdaw. Reza was educated at the University of Rangoon, Burma, where he earned a degree in Physics. After coming to the United States, he graduated from Portland State University in 1998. Professionally, he was trained as an analytical chemist for EPA method and worked twelve years for an environmental science company. Reza is the first Rohingya to settle in Oregon. Since then, he has sponsored other Rohingya families settle in Portland. Today, there are more than one hundred Rohingya families settled in Southeast Portland. Reza was president of the American Burmese Association of Oregon from 1996 to 2000 and has volunteered with various groups to help Burmese refugees regardless of their ethnic and religious background. He is the president and founder of Friends of Rohingya USA, a nonprofit that works on humanitarian relief in Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh as well as in internally displaced camps for Rohingya inside Burma. He has recently made two trips to a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh.

Sponsors for the event include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support form Eric and Alia Breon.

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Stories of Survival: A Conversation on Genocide, Past and Present
Apr
6
12:00 PM12:00

Stories of Survival: A Conversation on Genocide, Past and Present

What is genocide? How does it start, and what do different genocides have in common? Not every step that leads to genocide is obviously evil. Survivors of the Holocaust, as well as the Rwandan, Cambodian, and Bosnian genocides, discuss their own experiences and share their reflections on the current Rohingya crisis. As different experiences are shared, an overarching pattern becomes evident, giving hope that the pattern can be recognized and interrupted in order to prevent future genocide from occurring. This program is presented as part of Exiled to Nowhere: A Symposium on the Rohingya Crisis.

Rosalyn Kliot was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1945, after her parents' courageous escape from the Klooga concentration camp in Estonia. In 1947, the family sailed from Bremerhaven, Germany, to Boston Harbor. They settled in Skokie, Illinois, in a community of people who shared similar survival experiences. In her adulthood, Rosalyn owned her own business in southern California and later moved to Oregon, where she worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor and then a manager in her company. She traveled the West Coast as a Forensic Vocational Expert Witness at Supplemental Security Income hearings while she was the owner of her own consulting business. She has been a guest lecturer at Portland State and Southern Oregon universities, a practicing artist, and a published author in various journals and newspapers. Today, Rosalyn focuses on her art full time, as both an artist and a member of the public art and selection committee for the City of Lake Oswego. She has been telling her family's story of Holocaust survival for over 25 years.

Sivheng Ung came to the United States from Cambodia in 1979 at age 28. She lived through the killing fields from 1975 to 1979, when the Khmer Rouge killed more than two million people. Sivheng's newly wedded husband was taken away, tortured, and killed by the Khmer Rouge. She lost her unborn baby due to extreme hard labor. Both of her parents, her grandmother, and youngest sister died within the same month due to starvation. Her brothers in-law, father in-law, cousins, aunts, uncles, and their children were also murdered, simply because they were educated. In total, more than forty members of Sivheng's family were murdered or died of starvation and diseases. Many Cambodians escaped to Thailand through the jungle and mine fields. Sivheng and her young brother were among them. They came to the United States in September of 1979. They are very grateful and feel fortunate to be safe here!  

Samir Mustafic was born in 1972 in a small town called Buzim in Northwest Bosnia. He was 21 years old when he was injured in a shelling attack by Serb forces in June of 1993, which left him paralyzed. The same attack killed his mother and sister. After multiple surgeries, and spending 9 months in hospitals in Bosnia and Slovenia, he immigrated to the United States. Following two successful surgeries, Samir decided to focus on the positive. To this end he learned the English language, put himself through college, and eventually became a computer programmer. Today he works for the State of Oregon as a Software Architect, mostly supporting the Public Health division. He is a strong advocate for immigrant and minority rights. For many years he worked as a volunteer teacher at the BECO organization, teaching Bosnian language, history and culture to children born to Bosnian immigrants. He currently lives in Portland. He is married with two children.

Bonus Kayumba was raised and grew up in Rwanda. He has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering. He moved to Portland in 2005. Mr. Kayumba attended PSU and ITT Tech. He currently lives in Beaverton and is married with two children. Mr. Kayumba works as a CNC Programmer at Pentagon EMS in Hillsboro, Oregon.

Sponsors for the event include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support from Eric and Alia Breon.

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Bearing Witness: Documenting Genocide and Mass Atrocities
Apr
5
12:00 PM12:00

Bearing Witness: Documenting Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Photographer Greg Constantine, author of the Exiled to Nowhere book and exhibit, is joined by local photographers Andrew Stanbridge, Jim Lommasson, John Rudoff, and Elizabeth Mehren to discuss their experiences and ongoing work documenting personal histories of mass atrocities. In addition to their extensive experience, focus will be placed on the Rohingya crisis documented in the current exhibit. This program is presented as part of Exiled to Nowhere: A Symposium on the Rohingya Crisis.

Documentary photographer Greg Constantine has spent 13 years documenting the ongoing abuses against the Rohingya. His work and the exhibition, Exiled To Nowhere: Burma's Rohingya have been shown in over 25 cities around the world. The exhibition documents not only the plight of the Rohingya, and how the tactics taken over time have led to the near destruction of this community, but also how, in spite of all that has been done to destroy them, the Rohingya continue to find a way to survive and persevere regardless of the ground beneath their feet.

Andrew Stanbridge is an Oregon based photographer who concentrates on global humanitarian, conflict and environmental stories. He has made photographs of the Syrian civil war, Burma's road to democracy, the plight of the Rohingya, the post-colonial culture and delicate biodiversity of Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia and the aftermath of war in Laos and Cambodia, in addition to many others. His work has been exhibited internationally in galleries and museums and has been published in many venues including National Geographic, Al Jazeera, VICE, The International Herald Tribune, The Guardian, Vocativ, Roads & Kingdoms, PDN and the California Academy of Sciences. He holds a BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz and an MFA from Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He is available for assignments and lecturing worldwide. Stanbridge is RISC trained and a member of the Frontline Freelance Register.

Elizabeth Mehren is a longtime journalist and former professor at the College of Communication, Boston University. She spent much of her career as a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, and previously reported for The Washington Post and other publications. She has written for many national magazines and is the author or co-author of four books. She is also a co-founder of the Global Health Storytelling Project, a collaboration between the School of Public Health and the College of Communication at Boston University. With her colleagues in that effort, she was a recipient of a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant in health communication. She has earned fellowships at the University of Maryland, the University of Georgia and Columbia University. She has taught at the University of Southern California, Harvard University, the Harvard Law School and elsewhere. Mehren earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of California, Berkeley.

John Rudoff is a photojournalist and documentary photographer based in Portland. In addition to local and international political events, he has covered refugee and humanitarian crises in Greece, the Greek islands and the Macedonian border, and Bangladesh. He is represented by Sipa-USA and Polaris.

Jim Lommasson is a freelance photographer and author living in Portland, OR. He has been the recipient of multiple awards and recognition for his books, exhibitions, and public discussions. His project, What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization, is an ongoing collaborative storytelling project with displaced Iraqi and Syrian refugees who have fled to the U.S. It was awarded a Regional Arts and Culture Council Project Grant and will be featured at The Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration, NY between May 29 and September 3, 2019. Following its 2016 exhibit, the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center commissioned Lommasson to create a world premiere exhibition, Stories of Survival: Object. Image. Memory., using a similar creative partnership with Holocaust and genocide survivors. His work is in permanent collections at The Library of Congress, San Francisco Museum of Art, The Portland Art Museum, Yale University, Reed College, The New Orleans Museum of Art, The Hallie Ford Museum, and The University of Washington.

Sponsors for the event include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support form Eric and Alia Breon.

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Exiled to Nowhere: Rohingya Symposium in Portland
Apr
5
to Apr 7

Exiled to Nowhere: Rohingya Symposium in Portland

  • Oregon Historical Society (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

April 5th - 7th at the Oregon Historical Society and Portland State University

All events are free and open to the public.

For decades, the Rohingya people of Burma have faced systematic discrimination and targeted violence by the Burmese government. They have been stripped of their citizenship, forced from their homes, and denied basic human rights. In August 2017 the Burmese military launched a clearance operation forcing over 700,000 Rohingya to flee into Bangladesh. In the face of extreme persecution, and despite the efforts of the Myanmar government to erase them, the Rohingya continue to show a face of resiliency and courage in their desire for peace, justice, and accountability.

This symposium brings together survivors, activists, and internationally renowned experts to foster a better understanding of the crisis and explore possible paths forward. The symposium will be centered around the photography exhibit Exiled to Nowhere by documentary photographer Greg Constantine. This exhibit documents not only the plight of the Rohingya and how the tactics taken over time have led to the near destruction of this community, but also shows how, in spite of all that has been done to destroy them, the Rohingya continue to find a way to survive and persevere regardless of the ground beneath their feet.

Panels and conversation over this three day event include:

Photo by Greg Constantine

Greg Constantine’s exhibit, Exiled to Nowhere, will be on display April 5-11th at the Oregon Historical Society. The exhibition continues April 15th through May 12th at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education with additional events taking place during that time.

Sponsors for the event include the Oregon Historical Society, Never Again Coalition, World Oregon, Americans for Rohingya, Friends of Rohingya USA, Muslim Educational Trust, KBOO, The Immigrant Story, Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland State University’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Lewis and Clark Law School’s Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance, American Jewish World Service, and RAIN International. With support form Eric and Alia Breon.

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Chocolate for Congo 2019
Feb
1
to Feb 28

Chocolate for Congo 2019

Treat yourself to a fantastic dessert while contributing to a great cause with Chocolate for Congo, returning to the Portland area for its 6th year. Mouth-watering desserts made with Theo Chocolate benefit Action Kivu - investing in the women, children and communities of Congo through vocational training and education - with $1 from each dessert sale going to the organization. Theo Chocolate, which now sources more than 70% of its chocolate from the Congo, has generously donated the chocolate for the benefit. Local organization, Never Again Coalition is also sponsoring.  

The best part? Some of Portland’s best pastry chefs and award-winning restaurants are participating! These desserts are available all of February, and with 15 locations and 28 days, you can try them all—some even twice.

Participating restaurants and bakeries include:

  • Ava Gene’s

  • Baker & Spice and The Cakery

  • Bakeshop

  • Bistro Agnes

  • Canard

  • Clyde Common

  • Coquine

  • La Neta

  • Le Pigeon

  • Little Bird Bistro

  • Oui! Wine Bar + Restaurant

  • Ox

  • Pie Spot

  • Tusk

Here’s a sneak peak into what some of the pastry chefs are making:

La Neta - chocolate and corn tarts with Morita chile toasted marshmallow

Clyde Common - Victoria Hutfilz's bittersweet chocolate pecan pie, smoked vanilla bean ice cream and confit citron

Ava Gene’s - chocolate frittelle from Nora Mace

Bistro Agnes - frozen dark chocolate marquise with pistachio anglaise, candied kumquats, kumquat zested meringue and a sprinkle of Jacobsen sea salt flakes

Tusk - chocolate pistachio whoopie pies from Mace

Canard - chocolate banana cream pie

Baker & Spice and The Cakery - flourless chocolate cakes

Oui! Restaurant and Wine Bar - spiced dark chocolate pot de creme, sea salt and Willamette Valley honey meringue with brown butter graham shortbread cookies from chef Althea Grey Potter

Pie Spot - chocolate-caramel corn pie

Bakeshop - chocolate persimmon tea cakes made with a combination of buckwheat and all-purpose flour, and laced with chunks of melted chocolate and orange flecks of caramelized persimmon; available at their flagship shop on NE Sandy and with select wholesale clients.

Seattle-based Theo Chocolate has generously donated the chocolate for this event to benefit Action Kivu, and together these two organizations are making a powerful impact that you can be a part of. Theo Chocolate sources 70% of its chocolate from the Democratic Republic of Congo, supporting more than 4,600 farmers and their families as they reinvest in their community. In a country where reliable employment, education and healthcare are hard to come by, Theo also supports a maternal health initiative that has led to a dramatic difference in maternal and infant mortality rates. Action Kivu partners with ABFEC, a Congolese non-profit. Your support enables direct human to human assistance to those suffering from unspeakable violence, giving them the tools to be agents of peace and change. It also encourages homegrown and sustainable solutions by caring individuals.  Click here to read the stories of success to learn how your support is changing lives!

The eastern Democratic Republic of Congo has been plagued with violence for far too long. The path to peace is long but Theo Chocolate and Action Kivu are making a real difference in the lives of Congolese people.

For more info on the amazing work of Action Kivu and their partner in the region, ABFEC, please visit their websites: actionkivu.org

Questions? Please contact Lauren Fortgang at neveragaincoalition@gmail.com

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Mother, Daughter, Sister - Film screening with director Jeanne Hallacy
Oct
14
4:30 PM16:30

Mother, Daughter, Sister - Film screening with director Jeanne Hallacy

Please join us for a free screening of Mother, Daughter, Sister (30 minutes) followed by a short discussion with director Jeanne HallacyRandy Blazak, scholar and expert on hate and hate crimes, bias, and civil discourse; Yusuf Iqbal, president of Americans for Rohingya and Andre Heller Perache of Médecins Sans Frontières.


This film exposes the Burmese military's practice of using rape as a weapon of war and gives voice to Kachin and Rohingya women activists calling for justice for these crimes. The film revolves around the stories of four women: Shamima, a volunteer counselor working with survivors of military rape in the Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh, Dil Kayas, a teenage survivor and San Lung and Lu Ra, the sister and mother of two Kachin school teachers brutally raped and killed in 2015, allegedly by the Burmese military.


Powerful testimonies from survivors, witnesses and activists explore the far-reaching impact of sexual violence upon women and communities, woven with stories of courageous women calling for justice and a unified stand for an end to impunity.


This film screening is sponsored by Never Again Coalition, PSU’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies and KBOO Community Radio.


Suggested donation of $5


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Mother, Daughter, Sister Film Screening
Oct
13
4:00 PM16:00

Mother, Daughter, Sister Film Screening

MotherDaughSis_B-579x1030.jpg

This film exposes the Burmese military's practice of using rape as a weapon of war and gives voice to Kachin and Rohingya women activists calling for justice for these crimes. The film revolves around the stories of four women: Shamima, a volunteer counselor working with survivors of military rape in the Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh, Dil Kayas, a teenage survivor and San Lung and Lu Ra, the sister and mother of two Kachin school teachers brutally raped and killed in 2015, allegedly by the Burmese military.

Powerful testimonies from survivors, witnesses and activists explore the far-reaching impact of sexual violence upon women and communities, woven with stories of courageous women calling for justice and a unified stand for an end to impunity.

A panel discussion will follow the short film and includes filmmaker Jeanne Hallacy and Aerlyn Pfeil, a certified professional midwife, sexual violence program consultant, and board member for Medecins Sans Frontieres and Yusuf Iqbal, Rohingya community leader in Portland and president of Americans for Rohingya. This screening is co-sponsored by Portland State University's Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Never Again Coalition, and KBOO Community Radio with special thanks to Cinema 21 for hosting. 

MDSPoster.jpg



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Intent to Destroy screening
Apr
21
7:30 PM19:30

Intent to Destroy screening

On the eve of Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, we present a screening of Intent to Destroy. 
Pulling back the curtain on genocide censorship in Hollywood due to U.S. government pressure to appease a strategic ally, Intent to Destroy embeds with a historic feature production as a springboard to explore the violent history of the Armenian Genocide and legacy of Turkish suppression and denial over the past century.

Presented by Saint Kevork Armenian Apostolic Church of Oregon and Southwest Washington in partnership with the Never Again Coalition and the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at PSU. 

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South Sudan - How Education Can Change a Generation
Apr
17
12:00 PM12:00

South Sudan - How Education Can Change a Generation

Valentino Achak Deng is an advocate for the right to universal education and sustainable development. Valentino grew up in Southern Sudan where he was separated from his family during the Second Sudanese Civil War (1983-2005). He then lived in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya for nine years where he received his education and began his public service
career. In 2001 he resettled to Atlanta and has since toured the US and Europe speaking about his life in Sudan, his experience as a refugee, and his collaboration with author Dave Eggers on “What Is the What”, the novelized version of Deng’s life story. In 2006, Deng and Eggers established the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation to help rebuild Sudanese
communities by increasing access to educational opportunities. The foundation’s focus is on quality education, vocational training, sustainable development, and girls’ education. Despite Deng’s hardships, he maintains an unwavering, positive outlook on South Sudan and believes the solution lies in increased education and knowledge of human rights and improved
economic opportunities.
For more information about the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation, please click here: http://www.vadfoundation.org/

The event is presented by PSU's University Studies and Pan-African Commons. PSU Co-sponsors include Global Diversity and Inclusion, School of Gender, Race, and Nations, Department of English and the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project. Additionally co-sponsored by the Never Again Coalition.

 

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Stand Up! Lessons from the Holocaust
Apr
10
12:00 PM12:00

Stand Up! Lessons from the Holocaust

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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You can now view the Stand Up: Lessons from the Holocaust HERE.

The Never Again Coalition will premiere their short documentary, Stand Up! Lessons from the Holocaustfeaturing interviews of four Holocaust survivors responding to questions from students. Can their experiences teach us to be upstanders today? Followed by Q&A. Special invitees are documentary participants and videographers.  Co-sponsored by OJMCHE, Congregation Neveh Shalom, and Kol Shalom Community for Humanistic Judaism

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The documentary will premiere as part of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education's Brown Bag Lunch Series. 12-1pm at 724 NW Davis St. Portland, OR.

Free and open to the public.

 

 

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Screening of Desert Wounds
Mar
11
2:00 PM14:00

Screening of Desert Wounds

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for the West Coast premiere of Nili Dotan's Desert Wounds

With an international refugee crisis afflicting the entire globe, Desert Wounds follows the specific journeys of two women from Sudan and Eritrea, who are fleeing war, dictatorship, and religious persecution in their countries. Over a five-year period, they seek asylum in Israel, later in Uganda, attempting to build new lives while still remaining under the constant threat of deportation.

A Q&A will follow the film.

Co-presented by the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at PSU, Never Again Coalition, the Institute for Judaic Studies and Beit Haverim.

Tickets: $5 Members, $8 General Public, Free for Students with valid ID

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Chocolate for Congo
Feb
1
to Feb 28

Chocolate for Congo

The 5th Annual Chocolate for Congo will be taking place for the entire month of February in participating restaurants and bakeries throughout Portland. It couldn't be easier to do a little good while indulging in some of the tastiest desserts in town.

All month long, 13 Portland restaurants and bakeries will be serving up chocolate desserts made with Theo Chocolate. One dollar from the sale of each dessert will go to Eastern Congo Initiative (ECI), a non-profit working on grant-making and advocacy with and for the people of eastern Congo. Theo Chocolate, which now sources more than 70% of its chocolate from the Congo, has generously donated the chocolate for the benefit. 

Participating restaurants and bakeries are Baker & SpiceBar Avignon,Bistro AgnesCoquineLe PigeonLittle Bird Bistro, Måurice, Oui! Wine Bar + RestaurantOx RestaurantPacific Pie Company, Pie Spot,  Tusk, and Quaintrelle.

Here are a few highlights - Nora Antene will be making Chocolate and Tehina Marbled Cheesecake at Tusk. Soon to be open Bistro Agnes will be offering a classic Tarte au Chocolate. Over at it's sister restaurant Ox, you can Turtle Sundae with Theo Chocolate Ice Cream, Salted Caramel Sauce, Chantilly Cream, Roasted Pecans, and Amarena Cherry. Little Bird's pastry chef Erin Hughes has created a Chocolate Rootbeer Cake with toasted marshmallow ice cream, malt crumb, burnt meringue.

The eastern Democratic Republic of Congo has been plagued with violence for far too long. The path to peace is long but through their partnership, With the support of export partner Esco Kivu, Theo Chocolate and Eastern Congo Initiative are making a real difference in the lives of Congolese people. Theo's cocoa sourcing from Congo now supports over 4500 farmers and in turn, over 32,800 family members. Theo also supports a new maternal health initiative that has thus far eliminated maternal and newborn deaths in in these farming communities. 

Remember, there are 28 days in February and 13 restaurants and bakeries participating in Chocolate for Congo. Can you eat all 13 delicious desserts before the month ends?

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Never Again: A Jewish Response to the Rohingya Crisis
Jan
29
6:30 PM18:30

Never Again: A Jewish Response to the Rohingya Crisis

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Free and open to the public

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The Rohingya are a majority Muslim ethnic minority who have been ruthlessly oppressed by the Myanmar military, suffering indiscriminate killings, forced evacuations, rape, and other forms of violence. Over 620,000 Rohingya have been forced to flee their homes since August. The UN has called it a “textbook example” of ethnic cleansing. Others have called it genocide. We can all agree that brutal persecution of the Rohingya people must stop.

Join us to learn about the history of the conflict and present state of affairs from Yusuf Iqbal, President of Americans for Rohingya. Rabbi Joshua Rose, Congregation Shaarie Torah, will offer a reflection on a Jewish view of the crisis, and Professor Amanda Byron, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (HGS) Project at PSU, will briefly review the history of genocide. Postcards urging members of the Senate and Congress to take action to end this crisis will be available for attendees to sign.

The program is jointly sponsored by the Oregon Board of Rabbis, the Never Again Coalition, the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, and the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at PSU.

More info: http://www.ojmche.org/events/special-events-2018-01-29-never-again-a-jewish-response-to-the-rohingya-crisis

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International Holocaust Remembrance Day Special Program
Jan
28
2:00 PM14:00

International Holocaust Remembrance Day Special Program

  • Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for a special film screening of Scandal in Ivansk.

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Most of the Jews in the Polish town of Ivansk were killed by the Nazis, and the headstones in the Jewish cemetery were plundered for construction purposes. The film chronicles a group of descendants of Ivansk Jews who restore the town's cemetery, retrieving what headstones they can. When they commission a plaque that includes the word "collaborator," a national scandal is unleashed. This eye-opening documentary strives to understand why much of the nation won't accept "collaborator" to describe Polish people who aided the Nazis and benefitted from the genocide of Jews.

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Marta Eichelberger, OJMCHE's new Holocaust Educator will lead a brief Q&A after the film. 

Sponsored by Bincha's Fund of OJMCHE in memory of Bincha Nozyczka and in partnership with Never Again Coalition and PSU's Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project.

Ticket Info: $5 OJMCHE and Never Again Coalition Members, $8 General Public, Free for Students with Valid ID

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iACT for Refugees
Oct
22
5:30 PM17:30

iACT for Refugees

In partnership with the Never Again Coalition, iACT is preparing for the 2nd annual  iACT for Refugees ! The event is taking place at the Lagunitas Community Room where we'll have live music, Lagunitas beers on tap, a raffle, live auction, and a unique refugee preschool exhibit.     Get your tickets and join us for an inspiring evening!     Even if you can't make it, you can purchase raffle tickets. Check out the offerings  HERE !  iACT is on a mission to aid, empower, and extend hope to refugees facing humanitarian crises in central Africa. By connecting our community here in the Portland area with youth, women, teachers, and coaches in refugee camps in central Africa, we are creating a world where humanitarian action can impact the lives of communities living in refugee camps.  

In partnership with the Never Again Coalition, iACT is preparing for the 2nd annual iACT for Refugees! The event is taking place at the Lagunitas Community Room where we'll have live music, Lagunitas beers on tap, a raffle, live auction, and a unique refugee preschool exhibit. 

Get your tickets and join us for an inspiring evening! 

Even if you can't make it, you can purchase raffle tickets. Check out the offerings HERE!

iACT is on a mission to aid, empower, and extend hope to refugees facing humanitarian crises in central Africa. By connecting our community here in the Portland area with youth, women, teachers, and coaches in refugee camps in central Africa, we are creating a world where humanitarian action can impact the lives of communities living in refugee camps.  

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Heart of Nuba Screening
May
4
7:00 PM19:00

Heart of Nuba Screening

  • PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 238 (Browsing Lounge) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

One Doctor. One Hospital. One Million Patients. Welcome to the war-torn Nuba Mountains of Sudan, where American Doctor Tom Catena selflessly and courageously serves the needs of a forgotten people, as the region is bombed relentlessly by an indicted war criminal, Sudan's President Omar Al-Bashir. Two things remain constant: Dr. Tom's faith and his enduring love for the Nuba people.  Run time: 1 hour 32 minutes

See the trailer

***We are deeply honored and excited to have Dr. Jim Peck and Sara-Christine Dallain with us for the screening. Dr. Peck is a local surgeon who volunteers with Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)and recently worked at Mother of Mercy Hospital which is the focus of Heart of Nuba. Sara-Christine is the program director for iACT which provides humanitarian action to aid, empower, and extend hope to those affected by mass atrocities. Please stay around after the film to hear from them.***

Heart of Nuba will give us a glimpse into the devastating situation in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan. The conflicts in Sudan are numbered and complex. The genocide in Darfur is now in its 14th year. More than 3 million people are internally displaced because of fighting. We will have experts on hand to discuss the background and the current situation in Sudan. In addition, we will have information for organizations working on the ground with Sudanese refugees in the neighboring countries of Chad and South Sudan - iACT and Operation Broken Silence. More info on the film on their website.

Doors at 6:30pm. Film starts at 7pm. PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 238 (Browsing Loungemap

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Ahead of Time: The Extraordinary Journey of Ruth Gruber
Apr
27
7:00 PM19:00

Ahead of Time: The Extraordinary Journey of Ruth Gruber

  • PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296-8 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

At age 24, Ruth Gruber became a New York Herald Tribune reporter and photographer and the same year was the first journalist to enter the Soviet Arctic. A trusted member of the Roosevelt Administration during WWII, she was given a dangerous secret mission. A feminist before feminism, Ruth was never just an observer, she was a participant in the making of history. Run time: 1 hour 13 min

See the trailer

The theme for the night is Remembering the Holocaust/Bystander Resistance. Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day is the same week as this screening. Before the film starts, Rabbi Ariel Stone will lead us as we will take a moment to remember all of those lost during the Holocaust and join together to pledge to work towards "Never Again!"  We are honored to have April Slabosheski, Holocaust Educator at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education and Julia Reihs, local photographer, videographer, writer and storyteller with us for an engaging talk-back after the film. Attendees will also have a chance to share a reflection for a Together We Remember (TWR) project. TWR is a global month of remembrance and activism for all victims of genocide and mass atrocities.

For more information, visit the film's website

Doors at 6:30pm. Film starts at 7pm. PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296-8 map

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Children of Beqaa screening
Apr
20
7:00 PM19:00

Children of Beqaa screening

  • PSU Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 238 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

**We are collecting laundry and dish detergent for refugees. Please bring some with you to the screening.**

Children of Beqaa documents director Elias Matar and his daughter Lyla, traveling to the Beqaa Valley, Lebanon in June of 2016 to work with Salam LADC, a local NGO. Here in the Beqaa, there are over 500,000 Syrian refugees who have been living in a state of limbo for the past 5 years. These refugees are left in the dark; they have no country, nearly no rights, very little education and not enough food. Children of Beqaa gives a voice to the refugees, who just want their stories to be heard. Run time: 1 hour 16 minutes

See the trailer

The number of Syrian refugees is staggering. In addition to Syrian refugees overseas, we also have some in Portland. Learn how you can help Syrians both here in Portland and abroad. Learn about the online tutoring program Paper Airplanes. We are collecting laundry and dish detergent for refugees. Please bring some with you to the screening.

Information and volunteers from Portland Refugee Support Group, Islamic Social Services of Oregon State, IRCO, RAIN International, Catholic Charities and Lutheran Family Services will also be on hand. And don't forget, you can meet with Children of Beqaa director Elias Matar who will be preparing for his next trip to the Syrian refugees camps in Lebanon.  More information about the film on their website

Doors at 6:30pm. Film starts at 7pm. PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 238 (Browsing Lounge) map

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When Elephants Fight screening
Apr
13
7:00 PM19:00

When Elephants Fight screening

  • PSU, Urban Center Building, Room 212 (Parsons Gallery) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Don't forget to bring your old cell phones for our e-cycling campaign!

The Democratic Republic of Congo is home to one of the world's richest deposits of copper, coltan and other minerals increasingly sought after by Western electronics consumers. Rather than improving life for the world's poorest people, however, billions of dollars have been redirected to tax havens and to local militias. Fueling a war that has cost 5 million lives and counting since 1996, it may one day come to be known as the worst human atrocity in modern history. Can we stop it?                       Run time: 1 hour 30 minutes

See the trailer

Local activists, Amanda Ulrich and Rob Hadley will be speaking. They were instrumental in making Portland a Conflict Free City. We are now working on making Oregon a Conflict Free State. Legislation has just been introduced. This comes at a time when the Administration is attempting to dismantle the Conflict Minerals Act, part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act. Join us to raise your voice! We will have an e-cycling bin. Tabling from Stand with Congo, Amnesty International, Mercy Corps and the Enough Project. Find out more about the film on their website.

Doors at 6:30pm. Film starts at 7pm. PSU's Urban Center Building, Room 212 (Parsons Gallery) map

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Rising Up for Human Dignity 2017 Film Festival
Apr
6
to May 4

Rising Up for Human Dignity 2017 Film Festival

  • Portland State University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

April is widely recognized as Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month. With that in mind, we've teamed up with PSU’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project to engage people with a series of films and actions. Each Thursday night in April will feature a film, along with talk-backs and action opportunities. We want people to walk away from these films, not feeling hopeless, but invigorated and feeling like they can help make change. All films start at 7pm. View our film festival page for more information.

April 6, The Uncondemned

April 13, When Elephants Fight

April 20, Children of Beqaa

April 27, Ahead of Time - The Extraordinary Journey of Ruth Gruber

May 4, Heart of Nuba

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The Uncondemned screening
Apr
6
7:00 PM19:00

The Uncondemned screening

  • Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union - Room 26 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The gripping and world-changing story of a group of young international lawyers and activists who fought to make rape a crime of war. The documentary reveals the mystery witnesses who testified from behind a curtain to bring about the world’s first-ever conviction of rape as a war crime in Rwanda. Run time: 1 hour 21 minutes

See the trailer

Our theme for the night is Fighting Rape as a Weapon of War. Following the film, we will have a discussion panel including Amy Kayon, PSU Prevention Violence Coordinator and Aerlyn Pfeil, Certified Professional Midwife and MSF Volunteer.. In addition, we will have information tables featuring Panzi Foundation, Never Again Coalition and more. More information can be found on the film's website.

Doors at 6:30pm. Film starts at 7pm. PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 26 map

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Music Beyond
Feb
8
7:00 PM19:00

Music Beyond

Treat yourself to music, art and wine at Portland's Old Church for the benefit of Music Beyond and its work in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  The event will feature a classical music concert with the world renowned flutist and founder of Music Beyond, Kaori Fujii, along with other musicians on cello, guitar, and piano.

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Chocolate for Congo
Feb
1
to Feb 28

Chocolate for Congo

Chocolate for Congo is a month-long event.  Visit one of the twelve participating restaurants and bakeries in Portland and treat yourself to a mouth-watering chocolate dessert created with fair trade organic  Theo Chocolate just for this event.  A dollar of each dessert sold goes to Eastern Congo Initiative, doing advocacy and grant-making for the people of eastern Congo. 

Check out our Chocolate for Congo page for more details.

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